Joseph Matcha

There was a lot of stuff I didn’t know at all. I didn’t realise the vastness. You can talk about numbers, and the size of the concentration camps, but until you can picture yourself there, it’s hard to understand any of it really. We were standing in Birkenau, and I looked out across the camp, and I realised I couldn’t see the end. It literally stretched further than my eye could see.

The trip itself is very special. You form fantastic relationships with people. And the March is the perfect culmination to the trip. You feel this camaraderie, seeing so many people come together – this family of 10,000.

It was this huge sea of blue jackets and Israeli flags.

What we saw in Poland was immensely sad. But the March itself is strong and happy and positive. It’s about the future.

The March changes you – it was one of those reminders to love being alive, to be proud to be Jewish. I think about it every day.